EXAM HELP - B1, B2, C1 & C2

B1, B2, C1 & C2

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We can help you with the preparation for your B1, B2, C1 & C2 Exams.

 

We provide you with test papers, and can then work One to One, with you to sharpen up on the arears you struggle with. We Offer to levels of Support Basic & Advanced. Together we can help you pass.

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If you don't pass then we will REFUND you ALL the money you paid to us.*


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English Level’s and How to Understand Them

There are six levels of English ranging from A1 to C2.  They are A1, A2, B1, B2, C1 & C2.  Below is a full break down of the levels courtesy of the British Council.


A1 - is the lowest level, and at this level the student would be able to have a basic level of conversation, enough to say ask for an Apple, but not complex.

C2 - is the highest level and at this level the student can deal with complex conversations, and written material and understand them and be able to speak fluently able to use an advanced vocabulary. 


TalkingEnglish121 take students from all levels and with practice and support from your personal tutor you can move up through the levels. 


B1 is the expected level for Foreign Nationals who wish to have citizenship here in the UK.


Level A1 corresponds to basic users of the language, i.e. those able to communicate in everyday situations with commonly-used expressions and elementary vocabulary. It is important to bear in mind that the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages such as English. It consists of 6 levels of reference: three blocks (A or basic user, B or independent user and C or proficient user), which are in turn divided into two sublevels, 1 and 2. 


SKILLS AT LEVEL A1


One of the questions you might ask yourself when you read this information is, what language competences characterise a person who can prove they have a level A1 in English? The CEFRL specifies the following:


• He/she can understand and use very frequently-used everyday expressions as well as simple phrases to meet immediate needs.

• He/she can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, things he/she has and people he/she knows.

• He/she can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to cooperate.


Level A2 corresponds to basic users of the language, i.e. those able to communicate in everyday situations with commonly-used expressions and elementary vocabulary. It is important to bear in mind that the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages such as English. It consists of 6 levels of reference: three blocks (A or basic user, B or independent user and C or proficient user), which are in turn divided into two sublevels, 1 and 2. 


SKILLS AT LEVEL A2


One of the questions you might ask yourself when you read this information is, what language competences characterise a person who can prove they have a level A2 in English? The CEFRL specifies the following:

• He/she can understand sentences and frequently-used expressions related to the areas of experience most immediately relevant to him/her (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, places of interest, employment, etc.).

• He/she can communicate in simple, everyday tasks requiring no more than a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.

• He/she can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her past, environment and matters related to his/her immediate needs.


Level B1 corresponds to independent users of the language, i.e. those who have the necessary fluency to communicate without effort with native speakers. It is important to bear in mind that the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages such as English. It consists of 6 levels of reference: three blocks (A or basic user, B or independent user and C or proficient user), which are in turn divided into two sublevels, 1 and 2. 


SKILLS AT LEVEL B1


One of the questions you might ask yourself when you read this information is, what language competences characterise a person who can prove they have a level B1 in English? The CEFRL specifies the following:


• Is able to understand the main points of clear texts in standard language if they are about topics with which they are familiar, whether in work, study or leisure contexts.

• Can cope with most of the situations that might arise on a trip to areas where the language is used.

• Is able to produce simple, coherent texts about topics with which they are familiar or in which they have a personal interest.

• Can describe experiences, events, wishes and aspirations, as well as briefly justifying opinions or explaining plans.


Level B2 corresponds to independent users of the language, i.e. those who have the necessary fluency to communicate without effort with native speakers. It is important to bear in mind that the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages such as English. It consists of 6 levels of reference: three blocks (A or basic user, B or independent user and C or proficient user), which are in turn divided into two sublevels, 1 and 2. 


B2 LEVEL COMPETENCIES


• Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in their field of specialization.

• Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party.

• Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.


Level C1 corresponds to proficient users of the language, i.e. those able to perform complex tasks related to work and study. It is important to bear in mind that the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages such as English. It consists of 6 levels of reference: three blocks (A or basic user, B or independent user and C or proficient user), which are in turn divided into two sublevels, 1 and 2. 


SKILLS AT LEVEL C1


One of the questions you might ask yourself when you read this information is, what language competences characterise a person who can prove they have a level C1 in English? The CEFRL specifies the following:


• He/she can understand a wide range of more demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning in them. 

• He/she can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for the right expression.

• He/she can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. He/she can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing correct use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.


Level C2 corresponds to proficient users of the language, i.e. those able to perform complex tasks related to work and study. It is important to bear in mind that the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL) is the system that defines and explains the different levels of oral and written expression and comprehension for languages such as English. It consists of 6 levels of reference: three blocks (A or basic user, B or independent user and C or proficient user), which are in turn divided into two sublevels, 1 and 2. 


SKILLS AT LEVEL C2


One of the questions you might ask yourself when you read this information is, what language competences characterise a person who can prove they have a level C2 in English? The CEFRL specifies the following:


• He/she can understand with ease practically everything he/she hears or reads. 

• He/she can summarise information and arguments from different spoken and written sources, and present them coherently and concisely. 

• He/she can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations.


(above courtesy of https://www.britishcouncil.es/en/english/levels)